Reclaiming life without Facebook

c9bace321ba322cad4822d72aec76ad3I’m not saying all social media is bad but our dependence on it can be.  Most people you meet now instantly want to connect via Facebook and then that’s how you know them, how you interact.

My husband was the first to disconnect and while I loved the idea, I hesitated.

How would I share all these photos and maintain my business page?

 Truth be told I always worried about the safety of all our posted photos and never really enjoyed coming up with quick status updates for my business page.

I grew tired of feeling the need to check and respond as to not let friends down.  It became a chore.  So it was then in that moment of reflection that I closed my business page (and subsequently revamped my business to suit my new life) and logged off.

“Work hard in silence, let success be your noise”

Frank Ocean

Instantly I noticed a change with my interactions.  Personally wishing others Happy Birthday, getting those Sunday calls from my mom, and purposefully reaching out to friends all became moments to look forward to.  Now I chose the outlets I use for my photos and personally send them to loved ones.  Life became personal again and I wouldn’t change it!

Have you taken the leap to step back from Facebook or disconnect completely?  Why?  Has it made a difference?  


Thoughts on disconnecting:

  • Real time with real people is necessary.  It feels so much better to geta call or personal text verse a comment or ‘like’.
  • How many of your Facebook friends would you actually have coffee with8-People let alone discuss personal matters face to face?  Screen time tends to dull our filter.
  • Online emotional drain does take its toll.  We’ve all been hit by it at one point or another.  Whether it’s disturbing posts, others problems, constant complaints, or something that has angered us we are all guilty of letting something small take us down.
  • Even if you think a few minutes a day doesn’t hurt, it does add up.  I remember an app that came out a few years ago where it calculated all of your active time on Facebook over the years and what an eye opener!  Just up to 10 minutes a day could be over 60 hours lost per year.
  • Leaving doesn’t mean missing out.  Most of what we tend to post will be frivolous.  Yes there are important updates we all share but the majority of news feeds will be cluttered with re-posts we see several times over, what we’re eating, the weather outside, and other things we would normally only think of or chuckle at and move on instead of filling time with.
  • That urge to tell all really steals the experience.  You miss out on living in the moment when your thoughts become consumed with ‘I need to post this’.  We become so dependent on showing others we forget to give to ourselves first.
  • Ever wonder why most couples on reality TV shows split?  Because they have welcomed millions of others into their relationship.  My husband and I were never over-sharers because we enjoyed (and still do) the privacy of our lives and time together.  We have a stronger connection because we know a side of one another no one else ever will.  Facebook takes away from moments like that and moments where you could make your partner feel special and loved by surprising them or giving them your undivided attention.  And please ladies and gentlemen, don’t ever get angry with your partner for not over-publishing your relationship.
  • Two words: Online Arguing!  Sadly, I am guilty of this one.  In some c5d4d591679d110a69bbc78ace89447ecases I wanted to get my opinion across while others I needed the world to hear my grievances.  I’d like to think stepping away has given me a greater perspective on this.  Before it was all about what I thought needed to be heard and closure but I have a better understanding that if its important enough, there will come a time and a place to handle it.  Online isn’t it!
  • You can show the world who you are just by being in it.  You have strong views?  Love who you are?  Are proud of your family?  That’s the perfect reason to share but do so while still actively taking part in life.  Try a few other outlets like joining groups, writing articles, spend time visiting, invite others out, attend events, and be proactive parents.  Most importantly, be you!

Social media use can be positive but I do believe it is widely overused and in some cases misused.  As adults we have generations coming up that are watching us as templates on how they will proceed in life.  Let’s make a few small changes, or big ones too, and see where it take us.  Think about that friend that seems to be suffering from an illness or depression or even that overwhelmed mom you may know.  Wouldn’t it make a bigger impact on their lives if we were to step away from the ‘likes’ and quick comments to actually be there?  Maybe deliver some food, offer some help, send them something they like, or take them out.

In voice or in person a real relationship is built on that interaction.  Make a difference, go that extra step.

Thanks for reading!  And a quick thank you to my husband who is always giving me courage, support, and inspiration to try things a new way.  He has a way of always getting me to reflect on my life.  Thanks my King!

Mandy- Wild Red

Questions?  Contact us today!

All photos on the post are via Pinterest

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17 thoughts on “Reclaiming life without Facebook

  1. I unplugged from Facebook 3 years ago and to sum it up for me…’Comparison is the thief of joy!’
    This last week I’ve signed out of G+, and Twitter and I have been relieved! I am not a phony person and I can’t play that way either! I’m so grateful for this post.
    When you think about it seems like it’s the greatest lie ‘social media’ that isn’t social at all! I believe Facebook is a breeding ground for an anti social existence and I didn’t want to live that way!
    I very seldom desire interaction and when I do it’s got to be real!
    Downside… I don’t get family calls, photos or happenings anymore cuz the majority of them say ‘it’s on facebook!’ It’s sad just sad.
    Thanks so much for the post and welcome to your life 😀

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I have never had a Facebook account, and although I am tempted at times to get one, I like the fact that my adult children actually call regularly to talk to me. (I don’t text much either.) we all have to work a little harder to stay connected, but the connection is more genuine.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. How wonderful to find this post. I agree with so much of what you say. My husband and I disconnected 4 days ago. The freedom it gave us so quickly. Just amazing. I don’t see myself ever going back.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. I’ve come back and re-read this post several times. When I found out someone close to me was participating in a secret Facebook group, it changed my thinking about social media. I haven’t looked at Facebook since. I will probably revisit FB periodically to share links to my photography efforts, but otherwise don’t miss it. Very insightful post, belated thanks for sharing it!

    Liked by 1 person

    • I greatly appreciate that!! It’s difficult to peel back the layers of social media and decide what’s right for you and what’s acceptable. Finding that balance is key but I believe those that solely rely on social media like Facebook can never find true happiness because life is passing them by while they’re scrolling. Thank you for your comment and taking the time to read!! Wishing you the best!!

      Liked by 1 person

  5. EXCELLENT and completely thorough piece! You bring up everything I could ever imagine. My fiance and I haven’t visited FB for about 2 years now, for all of the same reasons you articulate so clearly. We were just discussing canceling the accounts, as well. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  6. I can totally understand the initial hesitation, though social media has a significant positive point in the range of connection, it does tend to be overused. Your pieces, especially this one, are really thought out and have significant personal value. I really do love the look of your page, thanks for the follow, I’ve followed back :).

    Liked by 1 person

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